Old Ordnance Survey Maps of Stockton and Darlington


To some historians the names Stockton and Darlington are indelibly linked with the early railways. Each, of course, has its separate history and we have a small group of maps for each. Though the towns gained in importance during the Industrial growth of the 19th century, they were already significant places. Here are the details. The index right should give you an idea of the areas covered by the maps.


The following maps in our Durham series cover Stockton. From the rural setting of Norton, where the tram terminated beside a village pond, the group moves southward to the busy centre of Stockton - with a population of over 50,000 by 1901 - and the many industries gathered around the Tees where Stockton meets Thornaby. Each map includes an introduction; most include extracts from a contemporary directory.

  • 50.08 Norton 1896 - published 2002; introduction by Robert Woodhouse
  • 50.12 Stockton (North) 1899 - published 1994; intro by Robert Woodhouse
  • 50.16 Stockton on Tees & Thornaby 1897 - published 1993; intro by Robert Woodhouse
  • 50.16 Billingham (South) 1939 - published 2007; intro by Alan Godfrey

    The following maps in our Durham series cover Darlington, a town which grew, under Quaker influence, into a major industrial centre and one of the leading railway towns of the 19th century. The North and West maps are double-sided to provide as much coverage as possible. For railway historians the main (Bank Top) station is on the Darlington South map, the railway works split between the Darlington and Darlington North maps.

  • 55.02 Darlington (North) 1896 - published 1993; intro by Alan Suddes
  • 55.05 Darlington (West) 1898 - published 1990; intro by Alan Suddes
  • 55.06 Darlington 1898 - published 1987; intro by Alan Suddes
  • 55.10 Darlington (South) 1898 - published 1988; intro by Alan Suddes

    Also available is a One Inch to the Mile Map, Sheet 33 Teesside 1895 which covers much of the area at a smaller scale. For details of our One Inch Maps visit the One Inch page.

    Parts of the county are also covered in our small scale Inch to the Mile series. For further details visit the One Inch page.


    Most maps in the Godfrey Edition are taken from the 25 inch to the mile map and reduced to about 15 inches to the mile. They cost just £ 3.00 each (Coloured editions £ 3.50). For a full list of English maps, return to the England page

    You can order maps direct from our On-line Mapshop. They are also available from various local outlets.


    Alan Godfrey Maps, Prospect Business Park, Leadgate, Consett, DH8 7PW. Tel 01207 583388
    The Godfrey Edition / sales@alangodfreymaps.co.uk / 14 March 2016